Post-Election Resources

CURRICULUM RESOURCES ON PROCESSING THE 2016 ELECTION

#IAMNOTAFRAID CURRICULUM FOR ALL EDUCATORS AND ORGANIZERS By Pa Nag Biag Itit Kayumanggi Nga Philipina

“What So Many People Don’t Get About the U.S. Working Class” by Joan C. Williams

Reflections on the Campaign and Election of Donald Trump

“11 Teachers Share How Trump’s Win is Affecting Their Students and How They’re Dealing” by Emily Orofino. 11 Nov. 2016. 

“Aftermath: Sixteen Writers on Trump’s America: Essays by Toni Morrison, Atul Gawande, Hilary Mantel, George Packer, Jane Mayer, Jeffrey Tobin, Junot Diaz, and more” The New Yorker.  

“Are You Listening?” short film by Katy Grannan, a filmmaker who travels around America to capture the nation’s mood in 2016. 

“Donald Trump’s Toxic Masculinity” by Jared Yates Sexton.  New York Times.13 Oct. 2016.

“Teaching after the Election of Trump”

Resources from the “Teaching Tolerance”

Post-election Activity: “Voting in Your Town”
Have you talked to your students about voter registration and turnout in their communities? Try out this activity to research the data and then promote voter engagement. 

Speak Up for Civility
In the weeks following the election, it’s as important as ever to commit to civil discourse—and to remind students to do the same.   

The Day After
In this blog, a TT teaching and learning specialist offers some strategies for “hitting the reset button” in the days and weeks following the election. 

What to Say to Kids on November 10 and the Days After
Yesterday, you needed to make students feel safe, but safety isn’t enough. Now tell your students the truth, TT Director Maureen Costello advises: Everything is not OK. We have work to do, and we can do it.

Resources on Empathy and Civil Discourse

(Re)Building Classroom Community Post-Election by Karen Barss. 16 Nov. 2016.
Help your students gain critical thinking skills, empathy and tolerance, and a sense of civic responsibility. 

“Fostering Civil Discourse: A Guide for Classroom Conversations”by Facing History and Ourselves. Specifically, one might modify the activities found on pages 9-11 that ask students to reflect on how they feel about race, and rather ask how they feel about the election.  An instructor might choose to use the full transcript from “Donald Trump’s election victory speech,” published by Sky News.com to foster small group discussions.

“Give Your Empathy a Boost: Four Tips on Increasing Your Ability to Read Others Minds” by Marcia Reynolds. 26 Nov. 2011 Psychology Today.

“What is Empathy, Anyway? 14 Great Books, Videos and Images That Help Explain It” by Courtney Seiter.  7 Dec. 2015.